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HISTORY OUTLINE ANNIVERSARY DATES First 100 Clubs of Rotary International FIRST100-CENTENNIALS CLUBS 1 -100
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Brief histories of Rotary's First 100 Clubs
Rotary Club of Dublin 65
RI District 1160


 


History of the area
 


The idea of Rotary was brought to Ireland by William Stuart Morrow, who returned from the United States to his native land in 1911 - just six years after the first Rotary meeting in Chicago in 1905. In conjunction with his brother-in-law, William A. McConnell, Morrow formed the Dublin Club (22nd February, 1911),(see article below) after which he moved north where he brought into being the Club of Belfast (24th July, 1911)

In 1912, a few months after the formation of the Belfast Club, Hugh Boyd, the Honorary-Secretary of that Club, visited the Rotary Headquarters in Chicago for the purpose of obtaining greater knowledge of the Movement. Whilst there, he discussed the possibility of Clubs in Great Britain and Ireland becoming affiliated to the 'National' Association, and on his return, the six original Clubs in these islands did affiliate as the result of the information which he was able to impart. At its 1912 Convention, The National Association of Rotary Clubs was renamed The International Association of Rotary Clubs (I.A.R.C.).

In May 1914, at a meeting held in London and attended by representatives of the eight original clubs, the British Association of Rotary Clubs (B.A.R.C.) was formally constituted. Each club was entitled to appoint two of its members as Directors on the Board. Those representing the Irish Clubs were Richard White and William A McConnell (Dublin) and William C. Gabbey and Hugh Boyd (Belfast). At the Convention of the international association held in June 1914, the B.R.A.C. was officially recognised, and further, William Findlater (Dublin) and- W. H. Alexander (Belfast) were respectively elected Vice-President and Director of the International Association. In 1912 Charles E. White (Belfast) was one of three representatives from the B.A.R.C on a joint Committee that met in Chicago for the purpose of drawing up a constitution for the international association. At the international convention in 1922, the International Association of Rotary Clubs changed its title to Rotary International (the suggestion of this new title coming from Charles E. White). At the same time, the British Association voluntarily affiliated itself to the international movement and changed its name from The British Association of Rotary Clubs to Rotary International, Association Great Britain and Ireland; this was subsequently changed again to Rotary International in Britain and Ireland (R.I.B.I.). It was a condition of the affiliation by the British Association to the International Association that the liberties and practices already in force in the Clubs in these islands would be preserved, and they were in fact safeguarded by the International Convention of 1927 and 1933.

'Cogs', the district magazine, first appeared as a Dublin City publication on 17th November 1913. With the approval of the District Council on 30th November 1928 Cogs became the official journal of all the Clubs in the District. 'Cogs', together with our district directory, or 'Roster' are the pride of the district. The detail contained in our district directory remains unique in the Rotary world. The district's presence on the Internet and increasing use of modern communications is a natural extension of these publications.

History 

By Rotary's 25th anniversary, Rotary had spread rapidly across the Atlantic to Ireland, Great Britain and Western Europe.  Six years after Chicago lawyer Paul Harris had formed the first Rotary club in 1905, clubs were organized in Dublin and Belfast in  Ireland,  and  London and Manchester in England. These were  followed in 1912 by clubs in Glasgow and Edinburgh.  Harry Lauder was one among many Britons who embraced Rotary in those early days. As one of the world's most popular entertainers through the first half of the century, Lauder joined the Rotary Club of Glasgow in 1914. A year later he wrote, "Rotary is going to be the greatest and grandest cooperative institution ever founded".

Paul Harris' visit sudden and unexpected visit to Dublin! Click here.

1914 report from The Rotarian

Clubs of RIBI (Rotary International in Great Britain and Ireland)

RIBI Club Organized RI Charter Date RI Club # RIBI #
Dublin 22 February 1911  1 May 1913 65 1
London 3 August 1911 1 August 1912 50 2
Belfast 24 July 1911 1 May 1913 67 3
Manchester 1 August 1911 1 May 1913 66 4
Glasgow  March 1912 1 April 1913 60 5
Edinburgh 23 September 1912 1 May 1913 62 6
Liverpool 1 August 1913  1 August 1913 80 7
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