PAUL'S OFFICE: YESTERDAY AND TODAY

 

The room was removed in 2014. These pages are the only public record of these items, which are now in storage.

 

 

Welcome to the Paul Harris Office "Gallery" which was once in RI Center in Evanston. In this room, which was on the 18th floor of the world headquarters, (right), you could have found a collection of souvenirs, gifts & other items acquired by Paul Harris over many years.

 

In Rotary Center in Evanston, the office which was used by Paul Harris as President Emeritus, had been re-created. It contained many souvenirs from his journeys round the Rotary world, as well as gifts and awards presented to him and photographs of other distinguished Rotarians. The room, shown up, in 2010, no longer exists. 

 

This part of our website shows you some of the items which had been on show. 

 

The entire room was removed in 2014. This website with dozens of pages is the only public record. The items are in storage and may be shown,  from time to time at One Rotary Center. 

 

The RGHF Gallery contains a large number of photographs of people, events, and scenes some of which we have not reproduced on this site as yet because we do not wish to infringe any photographer's copyright.

 

This advice comes from the Legal Department of RI even though almost all are at least 60 years old, and most over 70.

 

The original bust is now on display in Paul's boyhood home. Wallingford, Vermont, USA at the "little red schoolhouse", meeting place of the Rotary Club of Wallingford. The new statue's body was completed in 1993 by Isao's son, Kimihiko Morioka, president of Rittaishashinzo Studios and past President of the Rotary club of Tokyo-Keihin.

 

The completed statue is of bronze-finish fibreglass. It was broken down into three sections for the trip from Japan, and delivered to Evanston personally by Kimihiko, who reassembled it with nuts, bolts and epoxy. The statue was dedicated on March 27, 1993."

 

This article was written by Candy Isaac of RI and was reproduced in the Rotary History and Heritage International Fellowship newsletter in 1998. We would like to thank all concerned for this article.